BottleNeck 1.0

  • Post
    Dan
    Keymaster
    US
    Hey guys, I have been thinking about upgrading my computer since it is close to 4 years old. It is a 6700K with 32GB RAM and 512 Samsung SSD. But before I decided to pull the trigger, I wanted to see if there were any bottlenecks on the system caused by CPU, RAM or HDD, for the software that I run and for what I use my computer for. I looked around for a utility but could not find one, so I built a little app that is mainly a tray app that monitors the CPU, RAM and HDD utilization in realtime, and displays the utilization in the system tray.

    There is probably already an app like this, so if there is please let me know and I can use it instead, especially since it will certainly have more features. Obviously there is Windows Task Manager, Process Explorer, KillSwitch, etc., but I really just want a tray icon that displays these three utilizations in realtime so that I do not have to pull up Task Manager whenever my computer seems to be running slow. If there is nothing already like this and if you guys have a few simple suggestions on how to improve it, please let me know, but obviously we want to keep it super simple.

    It turns out that there are no current bottlenecks on my main system, but when I installed it on my 8 year old iMac (secondary computer) running bootcamp this morning, I immediately figured out that my CPU is experiencing a rather significant bottleneck, and the reason it is running slow. The SSD and RAM were fine.

    BottleNeck currently only monitors the C Drive, but we can create an option to monitor all of the drives. I did it this way for now because from what I have seen, it is usually the C drive that creates HDD system bottlenecks, and pretty much never other drives.

    BTW, BottleNeck currently requires .net 4.5. If there are many Windows 7 users who do not have .net 4.5 installed, then I might be able to create a .net 3.5 installer at some point.

    BottleNeck 1.0
    https://voodooshield.com/Download/InstallBottleNeck.exe
    SHA-256: 8cc83ac999293f9ed073c068897556b278225115694875b2055b50c50cc8e2b7

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    gorblimey
    Participant
    none
    Hi Dan –

    Are you using a lappy or proper desktop for your work? This is important, as the solutions below are simply not applicable to lappies or tablets due to simple physical architecture limitations. If you are on a lappy, I strenuously recommend replacing it with a desktop unit, full tower, decent monitor and a UNICOMP 104-key Model M buckling spring keyboard. If possible, make sure your motherboard supports PS/2 keyboards and mice, as these use far less resources than USB and work better at all times. With mice, the PS/2 totally eliminates the “vanishing cursor” problem.

    For what it’s worth, a good desktop will see you for about 10 years, and can often be upgraded in place 🙂 🙂 🙂 My unit was purchased from an OEM dealer in 2014, and shows no sign of aging: Sandy Bridge i5-2400 3.10GHz and 4TB in 5 logical drives with provision for 2 external GSATA…

    C: has always been a trouble spot on MS-DOS and Windows machines, almost always caused by dealers and MS itself deciding that PC users are total idiots, therefore the system must be kept as simple as possible. This translates to supplying any computer with a single physical drive, and a monolithic C: on which everything was simply tipped in.

    With the advent of NT, MS found it advantageous to introduce the USERS folder, but it wasn’t until W2K that physically moving USERS to another drive became possible, but even then a simple copy and delete could not be done due to MS’s use of sym-links which even on W10 do not auto-update from a drag-n-drop. Microsoft does have a documented method for moving USERS to another drive, but it’s not advertised widely — and some of USERS is better left on C: anyway, as they are very system-related.

    The best method of fixing a bottleneck problem is to install a second HDD, and create separate accounts for each user: typically yourself in a LUA and the Admin for running with scissors. Then set up your LUA data structure in the new HDD. At this stage, you may wish to uncover the MS method of moving your USERS to the new data drive, but really you don’t need to. AFAIK, no version of Windows sends your data to C:Users by default, although you will probably need to set things like download folders in your browsers etc.

    While installing the new drive, it is worthwhile making a 10 or 20 GB swapfile on the outer rim of the drive: just partition a suitable logical drive, then allocate the entirety of the remainder to your data, giving you a small D: and a large E: 🙂 Then tell Windows to not use C: as a swapfile and use D: instead. This on its own will eliminate most of your bottleneck problems.

    Now you can — when necessary — simply format C: and reinstall.

    (I use and recommend Surun, currently at <https://sourceforge.net/projects/surun/>, which gives a *nix “sudo” to Windows users.)

    _________________________________

    Understanding the scope of the problem is the first step on the path to true panic. [Florence Ambrose, "Freefall"]
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    Dan
    Keymaster
    US
    I always use desktops, I cannot stand laptops ;).
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